From Friends President, Judith C. Bautch...

It is a privilege for me to share this exciting news. The Friends’ proposal for the Discovery Center, an educational center that will be built on the refuge was awarded $450,000 by the Trempealeau County Board. If you know a Trempealeau County Supervisor, thank them for their support. This money is from the CapX2020 fund paid to the county to mitigate the environmental damage from the new power line that is being built. 

The proposed Education Center perfectly met the goals for funding! The Center will be used by learners of all ages from the entire county and surrounding area and will use existing programs as well as develop new ones. 

Currently over 4,000 students attend environmental programs at the refuge annually. These sessions are weather dependent. Sometimes they must be cut short or cancelled because of weather and the fact that we have no indoor facility. This is Wisconsin and we are rugged, but there are limits! 

Although the award from the CapX2020 funds and in kind donations may not completely meet the expense of the facility, the board has plans for fund raising. This funding award is great news. We will keep you posted.

Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 6200 acres of prairies and wetlands.  The Refuge is home to a diversity of plants and animals, including rare species and habitats such as wetlands, prairies and savannahs.  The Refuge is an important resting and feeding site on the Mississippi Flyway, a major international bird migration corridor. Continuing development along the Mississippi Flyway has reduced the suitable area available to migrating birds for critical rest stops, making the Refuge increasingly important.   

Friends of Trempealeau Refuge 
exist for the purpose of supporting 
Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge
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This page was last updated: October 29, 2014
Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 6226 acres of prairies and wetlands.  The Refuge is home to a diversity of plants and animals, including rare species and habitats such as wetlands, prairies and savannahs.  The Refuge is an important resting and feeding site on the Mississippi Flyway, a major international bird migration corridor. Continuing development along the Mississippi Flyway has reduced the suitable area available to migrating birds for critical rest stops, making the Refuge increasingly important.   
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2014 Fall