On the Refuge...
Prairie flowers continue to be spectacular with the latest blooms of Black-eyed Susan, Hoary Vervain and Leadplant. Liatris is beautiful!  Many monarch caterpillars have been spotted on the common milkweed all around the office.

Black tern chicks have hatched out in front of the deck, ground squirrels continue to wrestle and tumble out in the grass by the deck...they are fun to watch!

There is more:  Construction of the Environmental Classroom at the Refuge has begun. This is a four season building that will be used for the indoor portion of education programs. The classroom will be used by learners of all ages, but the majority will be school age children. Annually 4,000 students come to the Refuge for learning activities related to the environment. Currently, classes have been seasonal and limited by weather conditions. The classroom will increase the learning opportunities because classes can be held year round and groups will not be turned away because of bad weather. A late Fall completion of the building is anticipated. 


Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 6200 acres of prairies and wetlands.  The Refuge is home to a diversity of plants and animals, including rare species and habitats such as wetlands, prairies and savannahs.  The Refuge is an important resting and feeding site on the Mississippi Flyway, a major international bird migration corridor. Continuing development along the Mississippi Flyway has reduced the suitable area available to migrating birds for critical rest stops, making the Refuge increasingly important.   

Friends of Trempealeau Refuge 
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Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge
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This page was last updated: July 28, 2015
Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 6226 acres of prairies and wetlands.  The Refuge is home to a diversity of plants and animals, including rare species and habitats such as wetlands, prairies and savannahs.  The Refuge is an important resting and feeding site on the Mississippi Flyway, a major international bird migration corridor. Continuing development along the Mississippi Flyway has reduced the suitable area available to migrating birds for critical rest stops, making the Refuge increasingly important.