On the Refuge...​

Almost Full Moon Snow Shoe Hike
Saturday, February 20th,at 7pm.

Join us for an evening snowshoe hike as the “almost” full moon rises over the refuge! All levels of snowshoeing skills are welcome. Beginners may arrive at 6:30 pm for some brief instructions; all others please arrive by 6:45 pm to gear up and get ready to go by 7 pm! Limited snowshoes are available.  If you have your own, please bring them.

Hikers please meet at our new learning center building (across from our maintenance shop). Hike will last about 1 hour and hot cocoa will be served after!

For more information or if you want to reserve a pair of snowshoes, please feel free to contact Jenny Lilla at 608-539-2311, ext. 6

Join us at Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge, W28488 Refuge Rd, Trempealeau, WI 54661


Construction of the Outdoor Wonders Learning Center is almost complete. Finishing touches on AV equipment, smoke detectors and signage is in progress.
Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 6200 acres of prairies and wetlands.  The Refuge is home to a diversity of plants and animals, including rare species and habitats such as wetlands, prairies and savannahs.  The Refuge is an important resting and feeding site on the Mississippi Flyway, a major international bird migration corridor. Continuing development along the Mississippi Flyway has reduced the suitable area available to migrating birds for critical rest stops, making the Refuge increasingly important.   

Friends of Trempealeau Refuge 
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Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge
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This page was last updated: February 15, 2016
Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge encompasses over 6226 acres of prairies and wetlands.  The Refuge is home to a diversity of plants and animals, including rare species and habitats such as wetlands, prairies and savannahs.  The Refuge is an important resting and feeding site on the Mississippi Flyway, a major international bird migration corridor. Continuing development along the Mississippi Flyway has reduced the suitable area available to migrating birds for critical rest stops, making the Refuge increasingly important.